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The Weekly ReFRESH

July 17, 2015

Edited by Mara Meyers

In this week’s edition, what Serena Williams teaches us about sexism and racism in America, tiny results from tech companies who made big promises about diversity hiring, and a new podcast that we can’t wait to listen to.

What we’ve been checking out…

The internet used to encourage a diversity of ideas, now it’s just a breeding ground for trolls. Ellen Pao thinks the trolls are winning.

There are over 2,400 elected prosecutors in America; 95% of them are white and only 1% are women of color. Does this imbalanced justice system seem equal? We think not.

In a landmark speech on race, John Metta addresses white liberal America and he doesn’t hold back or try and protect anyone’s feelings.

Despite promises made, several tech companies can only cite a 1% increase in diversity hiring. Let’s face it, that’s nothing to be proud of.

We’re always looking for new podcasts and we absolutely can’t wait for this one: The New Republic is releasing a podcast with Jamil Smith, called “Intersection,” which will cover issues around “race, gender, and all the ways we identify ourselves.”

The latest from our speakers…

Focusing on Serena WIlliams’ “unfeminine” body is just one piece of the larger story of racism and sexism in America. Zerlina Maxwell slams this narrative in her latest on Cosmopolitan.

In her latest piece for Salon, Brittney Cooper illustrates how inspiring it is to see Serena Williams, and black womanhood, dominate.

On KPCC, Ann Friedman converses about the way women talk and why she’s not sorry sounding like a normal human.

These Emmy nomination snubs prove that we may have another #OscarsSoWhite on our hands. Julie Zeilinger’s Mic article show this is simply a symptom of a much larger problem.

Aaron Hurst reveals what we can learn from the kid’s movie, Inside Out, about the way we work.

Shout out to Jamia Wilson for being named one of NoVo Foundation’s Movement Makers.

The latest piece edited by Sarika Bansal on BRIGHT explores how giving students 20% of their time allows for more creativity and thought leadership in the classroom.

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