The Weekly ReFRESH

August 7, 2015

Edited by Mara Meyers

In this week’s edition, what Planned Parenthood actually does, cultural appropriation don’ts, and why two monumental anniversaries reveal how far civil rights has come in this country and how far we still need to go.

What we’ve been checking out…

This female author shares what she learned from sending out her novel under a male name. Spoiler alert: sexism is alive and well.

Richard Branson offers solid tips on how to kick your speaking nerves (with a very strange analogy from Winston Churchill about a woman’s skirt).

The first-ever White House Demo Day press represents President Obama’s commitment to a diversified entrepreneurial economy.

It’s the most unfortunate deja vu for the Voting Rights Act which, on it’s 50th anniversary is under complete attack.

As the somber anniversary of Mike Brown’s murder by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson draws nearer, this haunting retrospective reminds us of where we’ve come from and where we still need to go.

Exactly one year ago, these thirteen thought leaders watched Mike Brown get murdered, recognized the larger implications his death had for our country, and subsequently started a revolution.

The latest from our speakers…

Trump may not seem like he has the chance of becoming a real presidential candidate but his embodiment of white America’s urge to “take the country back” has very real consequences. Brittney Cooper exposes the truth of his campaign.

The next time you hear someone say that Planned Parenthood sells “tissues and body parts from aborted fetuses” (which yes, a real organization really did say) you can show them Julie Zeilinger’s latest article on Mic.

Cultural sharing and cultural appropriation are definitely not the same thing. Jamia Wilson illuminates the difference.

Samhita Mukhopadhyay participated in a comedian debate about the way Amy Schumer’s movie Trainwreck deals (and doesn’t deal) with feminism and race.

Michael Murphy was featured on this list of the ‘10 Ways To Improve Your Design Practice’.

Ann Friedman interviewed a badass boss-lady on how she helps guide others into becoming their most badass boss-selves.

Latoya Peterson tried to delete herself from the Internet and her failure to do so reveals a scary truth for us all.

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