The Weekly ReFRESH

October 16, 2015

Edited by Mara Meyers

This week’s reFRESH includes a critical look at Amber Rose’s slut walk, lessons from the best TED spoofs, and the history of the first computer programer who gleamed this title over 100 years before computers were even invented.

This week also marked our one-year anniversary and we celebrated by launching a totally-revamped and bold website. Check it out, let us know what you think, and consider tweeting about @FRESHSpeakers.

What we’ve been checking out…

At FRESH, we recognize how dangerous (and just truly boring) listening to a homogenous set of opinions can be. Hans Schultz agrees, and he has chosen to no longer accept speaking gigs on all-male panels.

Ada Lovelace was a visionary in tech before tech was even a thing (we’re talking all the way back in the 17th century).

While we want to recommend these TED Talk spoofs simply because they’re hilarious (don’t even get us started on Pudding Before Meat?: A World in Chaos), they’re also great lessons for those not-so-outwardly-obvious speaking tips.

Hollywood serves as one of the biggest and most powerful platforms for the white male perspective. Any movie that is made from the perspective of a woman or person of color is, in Ava DuVernay’s words, “a unicorn.”

The latest from our speakers…

Jamia Wilson, Jennifer Siebel Newsom, and Lindsey Taylor Wood sabotaged the sexist framework for questions directed at female politicians and changed the Democratic debate with the hashtag #AskHerMore.

Julie Zeilinger’s latest for Mic proves that The Girl Scouts are true practitioners of inclusivity. Now that they accept trans girls we’re wondering, when will The Boy Scouts step up to the plate and the right side of history?

Mychal Denzel Smith and Brittney Cooper join the Melissa Harris-Perry show to discuss whether or not the word slut can become a term of empowerment for women.

Dena Simmons will be making her Broadway debut at the first-ever TED Talks Live in New York City. You can catch her on stage November 1st and 2nd. Tickets are still available, only $100, and free for teachers and students.

Do you consider yourself more of a doctor, hospital administrator, or policy-maker? The answer to this question may just help you get closer to the purpose of your career and Aaron Hurst is here to tell you how.

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